Thinking with your Gut

It gives me great pleasure to share this article by esteemed columnist David Brooks of the New York Times about a topic on the leading edge of brain research - how what goes on in our gut influences our body responses, our thinking, our relationships, and our sense of wellbeing. You can learn more about this topic in my blog post "Are You Safe and Sound."


The Wisdom Your Body Knows

You are not just thinking with your brain.



By David Brooks

Opinion Columnist

Nov. 28, 2019


This has been a golden age for brain research. We now have amazing brain scans that show which networks in the brain ramp up during different activities. But this emphasis on the brain has subtly fed the illusion that thinking happens only from the neck up. It’s fed the illusion that the advanced parts of our thinking are the “rational” parts up top that try to control the more “primitive” parts down below.

So it’s interesting how many scientists are now focusing on the thinking that happens not in your brain but in your gut. You have neurons spread through your innards, and there’s increasing attention on the vagus nerve, which emerges from the brain stem and wanders across the heart, lungs, kidney and gut.


The vagus nerve is one of the pathways through which the body and brain talk to each other in an unconscious conversation. Much of this conversation is about how we are relating to others. Human thinking is not primarily about individual calculation, but about social engagement and cooperation.


One of the leaders in this field is Stephen W. Porges of Indiana University. When you enter a new situation, Porges argues, your body reacts. Your heart rate may go up. Your blood pressure may change. Signals go up to the brain, which records the “autonomic state” you are in.


Click here to see how Dr. Porges' SAFE & SOUND PROTOCOL is helping clients at the Vestibule Center for Sound Living to feel calmer, less anxious, and more socially connected.


Maybe you walk into a social situation that feels welcoming. Green light. Your brain and body get prepared for a friendly conversation. But maybe the person in front of you feels threatening. Yellow light. You go into fight-or-flight mode. Your body instantly changes. Your ear, for example, adjusts to hear high and low frequencies — a scream or a growl — rather than midrange frequencies, human speech. Or maybe the threat feels like a matter of life and death. Red light. Your brain and body begin to shut down.


According to Porges’s “Polyvagal Theory,” the concept of safety is fundamental to our mental state. People who have experienced trauma have bodies that are highly reactive to perceived threat. They don’t like public places with loud noises. They live in fight-or-flight mode, stressed and anxious. Or, if they feel trapped and constrained, they go numb. Their voice and tone go flat. Physical reactions shape our way of seeing and being.


Continue reading this article on the New York Times

Click here to see how Dr. Porges' SAFE & SOUND PROTOCOL can help you fee less anxious, more resilient, and more socially connected.

© 2018. The Vestibule Center for Sound Living

El Cerrito, San Francisco East Bay 

Valerie@Sound-Living.com | 510-232-6024

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